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The West Side Cowboy in Literature

 

“Larry Angeluzzi spurred his jet-black horse proudly through a canyon formed by two great walls of tenements, and at the foot of each wall, marooned on their separate blue-slate sidewalks, little children stopped their games to watch him with silent admiration. He swung his red lantern in a great arc; sparks flew from the iron hoofs of his horse as they rang on railroad tracks, set flush in the stones of Tenth Avenue, and slowly following horse, rider, and lantern, came the long freight train, inching its way north from St. John’s Park terminal on Hudson Street.”

— Mario Puzo, The Fortunate Pilgrim, 1965

London Terrace Tatler, February 1933

“The horses used in this unusual service are tried and true, and are perfectly aware of their important mission in life. They know traffic and excitement, thick fogs and blinding storms, the deep-throated adieus of departing liners and the tremendous thrill of screaming fire engines, but through it all they move surely and serenely, carrying out the Law of the City Council and giving opportunity for their gallant riders to amuse the passerby with amazing variation of the routine waving of the red lanterns. The effective term of duty of these mounts for this service is over eight years . . . and when their usefulness on the city pavements is over they are auctioned off at the Bulls Head Horse Market to continue their lives on softer turf in greener pastures.”

— from “Cowboys of the Cobblestones” London Terrace Tatler, January 1934

Note: watch 1930s promotional videos made for London Terrace Towers on the building’s official website.

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