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The Award-Winning Guide….

OTHL_v2.0_Cover_sm Available now: the second edition, fully revised & updated, of my book On the High Line: Exploring America’s Most Original Urban Park, the first illustrated guide to the High Line. With a preface and contributions by Rick Darke. Winner of the 2013 IPPY Award presented by the Independent Publishers for Travel Guidebook. For more about the new edition, published in May 2014, click here.

With more than 400 photos and a ten-page, foldout map, it’s a friend-at-your-side guide to everything a visitor sees when strolling through the park: the innovative gardens and their thousands of plants from around the world; the architecture, both old and new; and a neighborhood whose lively history includes the birth of the railroads, the Manhattan Project, S & M clubs, and the legendary Tenth Avenue Cowboy.

“I thought there was not much I did not know about the High Line but I learned so much about the history and the neighborhood. People are going to love it.”  — Robert Hammond, co-founder, Friends of the High Line

“Packed with photos expressing exactly how much the High Line Park has contributed to city life…the book captures exactly the delightful design and planting [and] the spirit of each little section of the park…It has the gentle reader reaching for the internet to start looking for plane tickets.”    — The Independent (London)

“This book captures the experience of the High Line, setting it in historical and cultural context, and illustrating how a city can meld its industrial heritage into a vibrant new landscape that can be enjoyed by millions. ” —  Piet Oudolf, landscape designer, the High Line

“The High Line is a unique elevated celebration of nature and the city and this book shows all aspects of this brilliant project captured in spectacular photographs.”  — Lynden B. Miller, public garden designer, The Conservatory Garden (NYC) and author of Parks, Plants and People

“Rails to trails! Dead tech repurposed — beautiful, and insanely popular. FDR Drive, you’re next!”David Byrne, musician, artist

To read more reviews and media coverage, see sample pages, watch video clips, and learn about the app for iPad & iPhone, visit the book’s companion website, HighLineBook.com.

I give slideshow lectures about the High Line and conduct private walking tours to groups of all ages. If you’re interested, please email me via the contact form.

On the High Line app for iPad & iPhone

Also available: a companion app for iPad that includes:

– Video of each section of the High Line
– A unique feature guides a user to one of 9 spots where he can take a photo with his device; when he emails it as a postcard, a “wild” image of that same space attaches to the email, so the recipient sees images of both the abandoned railroad and the current park at once.
– Options to browse different categories of interest including architecture, history, and nature
– Kids’ Stuff: stories and High Line features that are of special interest to young visitors
– Maps of the High Line showing nearby bars, cafés and restaurants, fashion boutiques, specialty shops, and art galleries.
– Interactive map identifies skyscrapers and important architecture seen from the High Line

Click here to download the app for iPad

Click here to download the app for iPhone

Art direction and design by Lorraine Ferguson, with principle photography by Scott Mlyn and Juan Valentin.  Cartography by Marty Schnure. Published by Thames & Hudson.

 

{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Susan Timmons January 26, 2013, 11:34 pm

    I’ve purchased your book and app on the High Line and enjoyed them both, thanks for taking the time to create something so detailed about this great park! I have one question I wasn’t able to answer from the book, however — do the stairs at the 14th street entrance emerge on the High Line south of the 14th St. passage (near the Washington Grasslands) or north of the passage (near the Sundeck)? I can’t quite tell from the maps and photos, so I would appreciate your help!

    • Annik January 29, 2013, 5:06 pm

      Susan, the stairs at 14th Street emerge at the southern end of the bog and just 20 feet or so south of the sun deck area and the wooden lounge chairs. They are just at the northern edge of the 14th Street Passage. An excellent source I rely on constantly is Google’s “Street View” of the High Line. If you drop the little yellow man right onto the High Line in Google Maps, you can navigate up and down the full extent of the park and get 360-degree views. It’s a great tool to help answer a question like yours. Thanks for your kind words and glad you are enjoying the book.

  • Susan Timmons January 30, 2013, 4:14 am

    Thank you so much for your help — that was exactly what I needed!

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